Category: Sea Fishing Rigs

Rough Ground Pennel Pulley Rig

Pennel Pulley Rig

Very Simple Rough Pennel Pulley Rig

 

Very similar in construction to the basic Rough Ground Pulley Rig, the Pennel bit just means the addition of an extra hook on the trace line. Before you tie the hook onto the end of the trace, simply feed the line through the eye of a second hook. When baiting up, wrapping the line around the extra ‘loose’ hook 3 or so times will hold it in place.

The Trace strength will vary depending upon your target species and the breaking strain of the pulley section will depend upon the strength of your mainline/shockleader. As an all round rig this will have you reelin ’em in.

Notes:-

1. Rotten bottoms are a must for rough ground fishing, but remember, with this particular rotten bottom the link will break if you try and cast to hard!

Don’t be lured into a false sense of security simply because you have a shock leader – with this, the simplest and cheapest rotten bottom setup,
you’d effectively be casting with 15lb line!

2. An american snap swivel (or similar clip) at the end of the pulley makes it easy to switch/replace weights.

3. Rotten bottoms aside, this rig is still definitely one for softer casting. With no clip down arrangement/impact shield etc., your beautifully presented bait has no protection from either the cast nor the impact! Consider introducing some shiny stuff if distance is necessary.

Rough Ground Pulley Rig

Pulley Rig

Very Basic Rough Ground Pulley Rig

 

This very basic Rough Ground Pulley Rig is a cheap, simple and extremely effective sea fishing rig used to target a wide variety of species. Perfect for fishing over snaggy ground, this basic fishing rig is definitely one to have in the tackle box.

The Trace strength will vary depending upon your target species and the breaking strain of the pulley section will depend upon the strength of your mainline/shockleader. This perfect all-rounder will have you reelin ’em in.

Notes:-

1. Rotten bottoms are a must for rough ground fishing, but remember, with this particular rotten bottom the link will break if you try and cast to hard! Don’t be lured into a false sense of security simply because you have a shock leader – with this, the simplest and cheapest rotten bottom setup, you’d effectively be casting with 15lb line!

2. An american snap swivel (or similar clip) at the end of the pulley makes it easy to switch/replace weights.

3. Rotten bottoms aside, this rig is still definitely one for softer casting. With no clip down arrangement/impact shield etc., your beautifully presented bait has no protection from either the cast nor the impact! Consider introducing some shiny stuff if distance is necessary.

Free-line Fishing Rig

Particularly when fishing close in, a simple yet extremely effective method of targeting predators such as Bass, Mackerel, Garfish and Pollack, is to free-line baits.

The rig is simplicity itself and consists of a swivel, a hook, and a bit of line in between. That’s it. To make up a free lining rig, simply tie a small swivel to one end of a 4ft length of light line and a hook to the other. Clip this on to the American snap swivel at the end of your main line, bait up, chuck it in and wait for the bites. It’s as easy as that.

 

freeline fishing rig

With so few components needed to make this simple rig, it’s important to get the few necessary bits of tackle right.

Trace line

An 8- 12lb trace line. Berkley’s fluorocarbon lines, such as the Vanish Clear or Vanish Transition, are ideal since they are virtually invisible underwater. These are best choice for free-lining by far.

Hook Size

This will depend wholly on the size/type of bait and target species. Depending on what you are looking to catch, consider smaller specimen hooks for scratching and for Mullet and anything from a size 2 Aberdeen (for small Pollack and such) up to a 3/0 Sakuma for Bass.

Hook Style

Everyone has their own preference here, but if Mullet fishing with bread, the Mustad bronzed trebles or the smaller B980 Kamasan Specimen hooks are very effective. For everything else, the B940 Aberdeen pattern Bronzed Hook (excellent worm hook) or the 540 Manta pattern Sakumas (great for bulkier baits) are a sound choice. They’re strong yet not too heavy and, should you snap off or get snagged when playing a fish, it’ll rust out to nothing quickly. It must be said that the 540 Mantas, with their wider gape, make for great livebaiting hooks also.

Chemically sharpened circle or crab hooks are also extremely effective, however, a hard hitting predator may well swallow the whole bait deep down still (and therefore the short shanked hook with it) making it and awkward affair to unhook cleanly should you choose to return it. In fairness though, the circle hooks generally do hook fish more cleanly but you may lose a few more in the process.

Swivel

Any style of swivel will work, barrel swivel/rolling swivel etc, but match it to your trace/line strength and keep it as small as is practicable.

Main Line

Main line breaking strain should be the same (or slightly higher) than that of your trace line ie. 10lb mainline for 8lb trace etc.

 

Other notes:

The beauty of this trace is that it is also interchangeable. In addition to clipping the free-lining fishing trace directly onto your mainline, it can also be used in conjunction with the quick float fishing rig and quick ball weight rig.

 

The free-lining rig is most effective when used in conjunction with live baits, check out our article on how to bait up with live baits for more information.

 

Quick Ball Weight Fishing Rig

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If you are after a bit of fun on a light line this summer, this ball weight rig is a ‘must have’.

Often, these kind of lightweight fishing traces are made up in one piece which makes them pretty much single purpose. Building the trace this way, however, will make it infinitely more versatile as well as being much quicker and easier to rig and de-rig.

With the sliding ball weight /retaining beads already contained between a swivel and snap swivel, it’s possible to mix and match your existing rigs (such as those used with the quick float fishing rig and free-lining rig) and chop and change at will.

This ball weight arrangement can then be used both to bottom fish with the traces mentioned above, and cast/retrieve with any number of different interchangeable traces and lures.

Just clip the swivel end onto your mainline and your desired trace onto the swivel clip at the other end and away you go.

Quick Float Fishing Rig

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Once the main part of the float fishing rig has been made up (at home, probably), the top end is clipped to the mainline and the bottom end to a length of 10lb mono with a hook one end and a swivel the other. You could even go the whole hog and make up a load of different length ones of those, too!

The other bonus of this system is that you can bait up a second trace (the 10lb line with hook and swivel) and have it ready to switch when the first one comes in, thus saving you time bags of time if you’re on a short session or up against the tide etc.

In addition, the traces attached to the end of the float rig can also be used in conjunction with the quick ball weight fishing rig and the free-lining rig. Double bonus!

Long and Low Rig

Long_and_Low

Post by: Airmech

3 Hook Cascade Rig

3_hook_cascadePost by: Airmech